The Apartment

This is probably the coolest creative design company in the world. I love these guys. Even their website is exciting without there being much there….Does it make me gay that I love this site so much? The Apartment

The Apartment

This is probably the coolest creative design company in the world. I love these guys. Even their website is exciting without there being much there….Does it make me gay that I love this site so much?

The Apartment

Ginormous Vocabulary

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. – The response from the “vocabularians” was so “ginormous” that the lexicographers let out a “whoot.” “Confuzzled?” You must be a “lingweenie.”
ADVERTISEMENT

The editors of Merriam-Webster dictionaries got more than 3,000 entries when, in a lighthearted moment, they asked visitors to their Web site to submit their favorite words that aren’t in the dictionary.

“It was a lot of fun,” Arthur Bicknell, a spokesman for the Springfield-based dictionary publisher, said Monday. “We weren’t expecting so many. They only had two weeks. But it shows how much people love words. It was very, very gratifying.”

Some of the proposed words even gained multiple submissions so the editors came up with an admittedly unscientific Top 10 list.

In first place was “ginormous” — bigger than gigantic and bigger than enormous — followed by “confuzzled” for confused and puzzled simultaneously, and “whoot,” an exclamation of joy. A “lingweenie” — a person incapable of making up new words — was tenth.

The survey, like a similar one the dictionary publisher ran last year asking readers their favorite word in the dictionary, “was all in the spirit of good fun,” said John M. Morse, president and publisher.

Getting a word into the dictionary is a more serious business, he said, with a candidate typically requiring years of use in a variety of printed matter to demonstrate the breadth of its acceptance and staying power with the American public.

In addition to the Top Ten, some loyal Mary Poppins fans submitted “supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,” which is in the Oxford English Dictionary, Bicknell said. He also spotted “a number of Harry Potterisms” among the entries.

“We will have to see about those,” he said.

___

On the Net:

http://www.merriam-webster.com

Xanadu

Xanadu

Just in case you were curious….

Kublai Khan was the grandson of Ghengis Khan. Along with providing religious freedom, he created aid agencies, increased the use of postal stations, established paper currency, reorganized and improved roads, and expanded waterways. Under his rule, the winter capitol was moved from Mongolian territory to the Chinese City of Dadu, which is modern day Beijing. He established the summer capitol in Shangdu, which was referred to as Xanadu. In 1275, Marco Polo, a Venetian explorer, visited Xanadu and a relationship of trust was formed between the two.

I just thought you should know.

More on Xanadu at bootsnall